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Make Art from Your Mistakes

Keep It To Yourself!

Hi There!
I’m so glad to talk to you again! Have you been creating fabulous things? We’re talking about mistakes today so here’s a book to help you explore and embrace them.
 
Mistakes, Do Tell! 
 
You make mistakes, right? Well, yeah – we all do. The problem is making a habit of pointing them out to other people!
 
Do you do this? Someone says your home is lovely, that report you put together is great or your painting is beautiful, and you say something like “Oh thanks – there’s a place right here where the drapes are snagged – the figure table didn’t line up – the paint mixed funny.” Showing off the mistakes in your work is not helpful for several reasons.
 
The first thing is telling someone who just complimented your work that it’s not that great is taking away their joy in both their appreciation of it and their compliment. Basically, you just told them they don’t know what they’re talking about for liking something that is so riddled with errors. Who wants that?
 
A more obvious reason is that you’re telling yourself that you don’t know what you’re doing. It’s a sneaky way for the inner voice of doubt to plant its seeds while sounding like a legitimate voice of authority. Don’t be fooled! That’s just one of those messages you should ignore – and certainly don’t let it speak out loud.
 
Here’s the most important reason for not reflexively pointing out mistakes: it’s not conducive to improvement or growth in the creative practice. Hmm? I know it feels like you’re trying to get better when you talk about your mistakes, but that’s all it is – unspecific criticism without any plan for improvement. Real creative growth and progress comes from an objective view of both the good and bad parts of a work along with specific points to improve.
 
So, the next time someone says something nice about your work – unless they’re a knowledgeable person willing to spend the time to help you develop a real plan for creative growth – just say “Thank you” and enjoy the compliment!
Good Stuff in the Group
 
Looking for inspiration? Find it in the weekly post that Kelly is hosting called Inspiration Spotlight! Each week she comes up with new topic for your pages to create and share. This one was mermaids – check it out! Be sure to look for the new post each Wednesday at the top of the feed! 
 
Create with Abandon!
 
Monette
 
PS Stop pointing out your mistakes and learn how to make art from them!
 

The Art of Mistakes Book

Keep It To Yourself!

Hi There!

I’m so glad to talk to you again! Have you been creating fabulous things? We’re talking about mistakes today so here’s a book to help you explore and embrace them.
 
Mistakes, Do Tell! 
 
You make mistakes, right? Well, yeah – we all do. The problem is making a habit of pointing them out to other people!
 
Do you do this? Someone says your home is lovely, that report you put together is great or your painting is beautiful, and you say something like “Oh thanks – there’s a place right here where the drapes are snagged – the figure table didn’t line up – the paint mixed funny.” Showing off the mistakes in your work is not helpful for several reasons.
 
The first thing is telling someone who just complimented your work that it’s not that great is taking away their joy in both their appreciation of it and their compliment. Basically, you just told them they don’t know what they’re talking about for liking something that is so riddled with errors. Who wants that?
 
A more obvious reason is that you’re telling yourself that you don’t know what you’re doing. It’s a sneaky way for the inner voice of doubt to plant its seeds while sounding like a legitimate voice of authority. Don’t be fooled! That’s just one of those messages you should ignore – and certainly don’t let it speak out loud.
 
Here’s the most important reason for not reflexively pointing out mistakes: it’s not conducive to improvement or growth in the creative practice. Hmm? I know it feels like you’re trying to get better when you talk about your mistakes, but that’s all it is – unspecific criticism without any plan for improvement. Real creative growth and progress comes from an objective view of both the good and bad parts of a work along with specific points to improve.
 
So, the next time someone says something nice about your work – unless they’re a knowledgeable person willing to spend the time to help you develop a real plan for creative growth – just say “Thank you” and enjoy the compliment!

Good Stuff in the Group
 
Looking for inspiration? Find it in the weekly post that Kelly is hosting called Inspiration Spotlight! Each week she comes up with new topic for your pages to create and share. This one was mermaids – check it out! Be sure to look for the new post each Wednesday at the top of the feed! 
 
Create with Abandon!
 
Monette
 
PS Stop pointing out your mistakes and learn how to make art from them!
 

The Art of Mistakes Book

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